NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)

FY 2010 Budget Table of Contents FY 2010 Budget
Organization chart
Appropriation language
Amounts available for obligation
Budget mechanism table
Budget authority by activity
Major changes in budget request
Summary of changes
Budget graphs
Justification narrative
Budget authority by object
Salaries and expenses
Authorizing legislation
Appropriations history
Detail of full-time equivalent employment (FTE)
Detail of positions
New positions requested

Overview of NINR Organizational Structure: Office of Director at Top, with DMS, DIR, DEA, and DSPPL below, followed by their respective Offices and Branches.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Institute of Nursing Research

For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public Health Services Act with respect to nursing research, [$141,879,000], $143,749,000 (Department of Health and Human Services Appropriation Act, 2009)

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National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Nursing Research

Amounts Available for Obligation 1/

Source of FundingFY 2008 ActualFY 2009 EstimateFY 2010 PB
Appropriation$139,920,000$141,879,000$143,749,000
Rescission-2,444,00000
Supplemental731,00000
Subtotal, adjusted appropriation138,207,000141,879,000143,749,000
Real transfer under Director's one-percent transfer authority (GEI)-216,00000
Comparative transfer under Director's one-percent transfer authority (GEI)216,00000
Subtotal, adjusted budget authority138,207,000141,879,000143,749,000
Unobligated balance, start of year000
Unobligated balance, end of year-1,0000 
Subtotal, adjusted budget authority138,206,000141,879,000143,749,000
Unobligated balance lapsing000




Total obligations138,206,000141,879,000143,749,000
1/ Excludes the following amounts for reimbursable activities carried out by this account:
FY 2008 -$450,000 FY 2009 -$450,000 FY 2010 -$450,000

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Institute of Nursing Research
(Dollars in Thousands) Budget Mechanism -Total

MECHANISMFY 2008 ActualFY 2009 EstimateFY 2010 PBChange
Research Grants:No.AmountNo.AmountNo.AmountNo.Amount
Research Projects:        
Noncompeting188$71,924173$71,746174$72,5581$812
Administrative supplements(6)442(6)442(6)442(0)0
Competing:        
    Renewal83,56892,90593,0210116
    New6921,0607324,0967424,8431747
    Supplements001330133606
        Subtotal, competing7724,6288327,3318428,2001869
        Subtotal, RPGs26596,99425699,519258101,20021,681
SBIR/STTR173,267173,345173,389044
    Subtotal, RPGs282100,261273102,864275104,58921,725
Research Centers:        
    Specialized/comprehensive217,851197,185197,18500
    Clinical research00000000
    Biotechnology00000000
    Comparative medicine00000000
    Research Centers in Minority Institutions00000000
        Subtotal, Centers217,851197,185197,18500
Other Research:        
    Research careers323,145333,236333,23600
    Cancer education00000000
    Cooperative clinical research00000000
    Biomedical research support00000000
    Minority biomedical research support00000000
    Other0397030002000-100
        Subtotal, Other Research323,542333,536333,4360-100
Total Research Grants335111,654325113,585327115,21021,625
         
Research Training:FTTPs FTTPs FTTPs   
    Individual awards772,446943,025933,025(1)0
    Institutional awards1536,5871687,3241667,274(2)-50
    Total, Training2309,03326210,34925910,299(3)-50
         
Research & development contracts03,75103,85903,917058
(SBIR/STTR)(0)(9)(0)(9)(0)(9)(0)(0)
 FTEs FTEs FTEs FTEs 
Intramural research93,854103,943104,002059
Research management and support349,9154010,1434110,3211178
Construction 0 0 0 0
Buildings and Facilities 0 0 0 0
Total, NINR43138,20750141,87951143,74911,870
Includes FTEs which are reimbursed from the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research

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National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Nursing Research
BA by Program
(Dollars in thousands)

 
FY 2006 Actual
FY 2007 Actual
FY 2008 Estimate
FY 2008 Comparable
FY 2009 Estimate
FY 2010 PB
Change
Extramural Research DetailFTEs
Amount
FTEs
Amount
FTEs
Amount
FTEs
Amount
FTEs
Amount
FTEs
Amount
FTEs
Amount
Self-Management, Symptom Management, and Caregiving 
47,137
 
43,548
 
42,847
 
42,921
 
44,079
 
44,642
 
563
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention 
35,640
 
38,155
 
40,073
 
40,143
 
41,225
 
41,752
 
527
Research Capacity Development 
23,622
 
20,348
 
19,432
 
19,466
 
19,990
 
20,246
 
258
Technology Integration 
9,987
 
10,939
 
10,368
 
10,386
 
10,666
 
10,802
 
136
End-of-Life 
9,361
 
11,490
 
11,502
 
11,522
 
11,833
 
11,984
 
151
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Subtotal, Extramural 
125,747
 
124,480
 
124,222
 
124,438
 
127,793
 
129,426
 
1,633
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Intramural research
9
2,411
10
3,348
9
3,854
9
3,854
10
3,943
10
4,002
0
59
Res. management & support
34
9,089
30
3,360
34
9,914
34
9,915
40
10,143
41
10,321
1
178
TOTAL
43
137,247
40
131,188
43
137,990
43
138,207
50
141,879
51
143,749
1
1,870
Includes FTEs which are reimbursed from the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research

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Major Changes in the Fiscal Year 2010 Budget Request

Major changes by budget mechanism and/or budget activity detail are briefly described below.  Note that there may be overlap between budget mechanism and activity detail and these highlights will not sum to the total change for the FY 2010 budget request for NINR, which is $1.870 million more than the FY 2009 estimate, for a total of $143.749 million.

Research Project Grants (+$1.725 million, total $104.589 million): NINR plans to support a total of 275 Research Project Grant (RPG) awards in FY 2010.  Noncompeting RPGs will increase by 1 award and $812 thousand.  Competing RPGs are expected to increase by 1 award and $869 thousand.  The NIH Budget policy for RPGs in FY 2010 is to provide a 2% increase in noncompeting awards and a 2% increase in the average cost for competing RPGs.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Institute of Nursing Research

Summary of Changes

FY 2009 estimate141,879,000
FY 2010 estimated budget authority143,749,000
Net change1,870,000
 2009 Current Estimate BaseChange from Base
CHANGESFTEsBudget AuthorityFTEsBudget Authority

A. Built-in:

  1. Intramural research:

    
 a. Annualization of January 2009 pay increase $1,495,000 $150,000
 b. January FY 2010 pay increase 1,495,000 22,000
 c. Zero less days of pay 1,495,000 0
 d. Payment for centrally furnished services 621,000 12,000
 e. Increased cost of laboratory supplies, materials, and other expenses 1,827,000 30,000
 Subtotal   214,000

 2. Research management and support:

    
 a. Annualization of January 2009 pay increase $5,200,000 ($72,000)
 b. January FY 2010 pay increase 5,200,000 78,000
 c. Zero less days of pay 5,200,000 0
 d. Payment for centrally furnished services 880,000 18,000
 e. Increased cost of laboratory supplies, materials, and other expenses 4,063,000 66,000
 Subtotal   90,000
      
 Subtotal, Built-in   304,000
CHANGESNo.AmountNo.Amount

B. Program:

  1. Research project grants:

    
 a. Noncompeting173$72,188,0001$812,000
 b. Competing8327,331,0001869,000
 c. SBIR/STTR173,345,000044,000
 Total273102,864,00021,725,000

 2. Research centers

197,185,00000

 3. Other research

333,536,0000(100,000)

 4. Research training

26210,349,000(3)(50,000)

 5. Research and development contracts

03,859,000058,000
 Subtotal, extramural   1,633,000
  FTEs FTEs 
6. Intramural research103,943,0000(155,000)
7. Research management and support4010,143,000188,000
 Subtotal, program 141,879,000 1,566,000
Total changes50 11,870,000

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Fiscal Year 2010 Budget Graphs

History of Budget Authority and FTEs:

Graph of Funding Levels by Fiscal Year 2006-2010

Distribution by Mechanism:

FY 2010 Budget Mechanism (Dollars in Thousands): Research Project Grants, $104,589 - 73%; RM&S, $10,321 - 7%; Research Training, $10,299 - 7%; Research Centers, $7,185 - 5%; R&D Contracts, $3,917 - 3%; Intramural Research, $4,002 -3%; Other Research, $3,436 - 2%

Change by Selected Mechanism:

Graph of Percent Change from FY 2009 Mechanism: Research Project Grants, 1.7%; Research Centers, 0.0%, Other Research, -2.8%; Research Training, -0.5%, R&D Contracts, 1.5%; Intramural Research, 1.5%, Res. Mgmt. & Support, 1.8%; B&F, 0.0%

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Justification
National Institute of Nursing Research


Authorizing Legislation:Section 301 and title IV of the Public Health Service Act, as amended.
Budget Authority:

 

FY 2008
Appropriation

FY 2009
Omnibus

FY 2009 Recovery
Act

FY 2010 President's
Budget

FY 2010 +/- 2009
Omnibus

BA

$138,207,000

$141,879,000

$35,877,000

$143,749,000

+$1,870,000

FTE

43

50

0

51

+1

This document provides justification for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 activities of the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), including HIV/AIDS activities.  Details of the FY 2010 HIV/AIDS activities are in the "Office of AIDS Research (OAR)" Section of the Overview.  Details on the Common Fund are located in the Overview, Volume One.  Program funds are allocated as follows: Competitive Grants/Cooperative Agreements; Contracts; Direct Federal/Intramural and Other.

In FY 2009, a total of $35,877,000 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds were transferred from the Office of the Director.  These funds will be used to support scientific research opportunities that help support the goals of the ARRA.  The ARRA allows NIH to execute these funds via any NIH funding mechanism.  Funds are available until September 30, 2010.  These funds are not included in the FY 2009 Omnibus amounts reflected in this document.

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DIRECTOR'S OVERVIEW

The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) supports clinical and basic research to build the scientific foundation for clinical practice, prevent disease and disability, manage and eliminate symptoms caused by illness, and enhance end-of-life and palliative care.  The Institute's scientific focus spans multiple disciplines and unites the biological and behavioral sciences to better understand the complex interactions between the physiological factors of health and disease and the knowledge, beliefs, and behavior of the individual.  Across all NINR scientific programs, research addresses the special needs of at-risk and underserved populations with an emphasis on health disparities.

The breadth and depth of NINR's research portfolio is ideally suited to explore some of the most important challenges affecting the health of the American people.  These converging issues include:

  • an aging population living longer with chronic diseases that require complex management by the patient, informal caregivers, and/or clinicians;
  • the growth of diverse racial and cultural populations in the U.S. and the associated issue of health disparities;
  • our ability to translate emerging patient management technologies into clinical practice and home-based use, and;
  • the increased demand for nurses and other clinicians, both current and projected.

Confronting these issues requires shifting to a patient management paradigm that is increasingly person-centered rather than disease-oriented, that focuses on preventing the development of chronic illness rather than treating it, and that features the person as an active participant in his or her own health.

The science supported by NINR seeks to advance this new model.  For example, NINR research activities address a changing reality in which individuals of all ages are increasingly living with multiple chronic illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.  NINR supports research to improve quality of life for these individuals by finding more effective ways to address their adverse symptoms, by improving their ability to manage their own illnesses, and by developing approaches to ease the burden on their family caregivers.  NINR scientists also design and test new technologies that allow clinicians to monitor chronic illnesses in individuals without ready access to health care facilities, and that allow these individuals to better manage their own health.  Finally, an aging population inevitably increases the need for improved awareness of the multiple concerns surrounding end-of-life care.  As the lead NIH Institute for end-of-life research, NINR supports studies that explore key end-of-life areas such as clinician/family member communication, decision-making, and issues of pediatric end-of-life and palliative care.

Ultimately, the best way to address the problems of chronic illnesses is to prevent the development of such illnesses in the first place.  Therefore, NINR-supported scientists develop research-based health promotion and disease prevention programs, with a special focus on populations that experience health disparities.  For example, NINR scientists have designed culturally sensitive interventions that have successfully reduced HIV risk behaviors in minority populations, and other interventions that have reduced risk behaviors for obesity and diabetes in rural populations.  Overall, NINR research in disease prevention explores the connections among lifestyle, biology, behavior, environment, geography, socio-cultural contexts, technologies, and economic factors, and applies this in-depth knowledge to reducing society's future burdens of chronic illnesses.

NINR training opportunities seek to educate research scholars to become the nursing faculty of the future.  This will have a direct impact on improving the ability of academic institutions to educate new nurses.  Through NINR-supported efforts such as research training grants, the NIH Graduate Partnership Program, and hands-on research training programs on the NIH campus in association with the NINR Intramural Research Program, the Institute prepares future scientists for independent research careers.

NINR's future priorities and scientific objectives are reflected in its research programs and proposed research activities for FY 2010.  Specific activities will include an effort to advance palliative care research for children experiencing serious illness or bereavement.  In addition, NINR will continue to support research centers to enhance research capacity and advance health promotion, quality of life, and end-of-life research.

Broadly, NINR will continue to support innovative studies in research areas highlighted in its strategic plan, including: self-management, symptom management, and caregiving; health promotion and disease prevention; research capacity development; technology integration; and end-of-life science.  Results from these studies will inform future strategies as NINR begins to consider its strategic plan beyond 2010.  In addition, input from stakeholders, trans-NIH planning and priority setting processes such as the NIH Roadmap, Neuroscience Blueprint, and Pain Consortium, and changing public health concerns will continue to shape the future directions of NINR research.

NINR is committed to improving clinical practice through the generation of new knowledge and leaders in science.  In strategically focusing its research on enhancing quality of life, improving patient self-management, and discovering better ways to prevent disease, NINR promotes the translation of scientific discoveries into general practice and ensures that current public health needs are proactively addressed.

Overall Budget Policy: Investigator-initiated research projects, supporting new investigators, research training, and career development continue to be the Institute's highest priorities.  The NINR will follow the NIH Budget policy for RPGs in FY 2010, which is to provide a 2% inflationary increase in noncompeting awards and a 2% inflationary increase in the average cost for competing RPGs.  NINR carefully evaluates investigator-initiated grant applications for all research programs.  Scientific reviews are conducted, and the results are presented to the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research to determine the level of recommended support for the application, if any.  The level of support provided for Institute-initiated projects is also evaluated.  The Institute maintains a careful balance between solicitations issued to the extramural community in areas that need stimulation and funding made available to support investigator-initiated projects.  Intramural Research and Research Management and Support each receive increases of 1.5% to help cover the cost of pay and other associated costs.  NINR will continue to support new investigators and to maintain an adequate number of competing RPGs.

In addition, consistent with the President's multi-year commitment to double funding for cancer research, and with a government-wide initiative to enhance support for autism research, NINR plans to increase supportfor these two areas of research in FY 2010.  Increased efforts in cancer and autism research will be accomplished across NINR's research programs, and include research projects consistent with NINR's mission and strategic plan.

FY 2010 JUSTIFICATION BY ACTIVITY DETAIL

Program Descriptions and Accomplishments

Self-Management, Symptom Management, and Caregiving

Improving the quality of life of individuals, both in clinical practice as well as the home setting, is a fundamental tenet of the NINR mission. NINR studies quality of life as a continuum composed of three key elements: self-management, symptom management, and caregiving. The NINR Self-Management, Symptom Management, and Caregiving program seeks to address the challenges of short- and long-term disease and disability management by enhancing the individual's role in managing disease, relieving symptoms, and improving health outcomes for individuals and caregivers.Current research projects supported by this program explore: interventions that reduce symptom burden; interventions to improve support for caregivers of patients with chronic disease; and techniques to promote healthy behaviors that improve the ability of patients to be partners in managing their own care. Among many other recent program activities in this area, NINR is sponsoring an initiative under the auspices of the NIH Pain Consortium to explore mechanisms, measurement, and management of acute and chronic pain. Pain research sought under this initiative spans all areas of science, from research on the basic neural pathways of pain, to pain-related behavioral and social sciences research.

Budget Policy: The FY 2010 budget estimate for this program is $44.642 million, an increase of $563 thousand or 1.3 percent above the FY 2009 Estimate. NINR plans in FY 2010 to continue to address the many challenges and opportunities that exist in the areas of self-management, symptom management, and caregiving as an important part of a strategically balanced research portfolio.

Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

The NINR Health Promotion and Disease Prevention program studies the key biological, behavioral, and social factors that prevent the development of disease and achieve long-term, positive health outcomes in individuals of all ages.  Research supported under this activity seeks scientific discoveries of health predictors and prevention strategies across conditions, diseases, and settings.  Under this wide scope of research, efforts can range from promoting behavioral changes in individuals, to evaluating health risks in diverse communities, to assessing issues of patient safety.

In FY 2008, NINR solicited proposals for Centers in Health Promotion/Disease Prevention or Symptom Management Research.  These Centers will support shared resources and highly collaborative, interdisciplinary research environments for groups of investigators pursuing scientific inquiries into innovative, effective methods for promoting health and preventing disease and disability.  The first awards under this program are expected to be made in late FY 2009.

Budget Policy: The FY 2010 budget estimate for this program is $41.752 million, an increase of $527 thousand or 1.3 percent above the FY 2009 estimate.  NINR plans in FY 2010 to continue to address the many challenges and opportunities that exist in the areas of health promotion and disease prevention as an important part of a strategically balanced research portfolio.

Research Capacity Development

The NINR Research Capacity Development program builds research capacity through centers programs and fosters interdisciplinary training for the next generation of scientists in basic, translational, and clinical research by means of individual and institutional training awards.  Through these activities, NINR addresses the national shortage of nurses by contributing to the development of the nursing faculty needed to teach and mentor individuals entering the field.  Among these opportunities, NINR provides support for trainees from underrepresented and disadvantaged backgrounds.

In FY 2008, NINR made its first awards of program project grants under a new initiative entitled, "Nursing Science Research on Interventions in Chronic Illness."  These awards, intended for investigators and institutions with proven and long-established research programs and funded through the P01 grant mechanism, support shared resources and a collaborative research effort for several large research projects.  The awards allow a group of investigators, using multiple approaches funded as individual subprojects, to conduct innovative, high-impact, and interdisciplinary research on topics of strategic importance to the Institute.

Budget Policy: The FY 2010 budget estimate for this program is $20.246 million, an increase of $256 thousand or 1.3 percent above the FY 2009 estimate.  The proposed level of funding will allow NINR to cover its current commitments, including NINR's Centers of Excellence in Symptom Management or Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Research.   This level would also allow new individual training grants to be awarded in FY 2010, which will directly impact the ability of schools of nursing to educate new nurses.  NINR plans in FY 2010 to continue its commitment to developing the next generation of innovative investigators and enhance overall research capacity in strategically important areas of research as part of an overall balanced program portfolio.

Technology Integration

The NINR Technology Integration program supports innovative, interdisciplinary studies to develop new and adapt existing technologies to improve clinical care and quality of life.  For example, research conducted under this program seeks to improve quality of life by developing technologies that assist patients in monitoring and reporting indicators of health status, such as breathing status, blood pressure, and blood glucose levels.

Current activities under this program include: developing devices to facilitate clinical decision support for care providers in hospitals and clinics, creating software modules that assist patients with making decisions on advanced care planning, and developing a speech translation device for improving patient-provider communications.  Investigators are also designing a system that will allow chemotherapy patients to report their symptoms over the internet or phone to nurses in a clinic.  This type of technology allows for better management of patient symptoms at home, and eliminates unnecessary trips to the clinic, which is especially useful for patients in rural locations without ready access to health care services.

Budget Policy: The FY 2010 budget estimate for this program is $10.802 million, an increase of $136 thousand or 1.3 percent above the FY 2009 estimate.  In FY 2010, NINR plans to continue supporting investigators who are innovative in their use and development of novel technologies that address current and future clinical care and patient management needs, and who will work to incorporate these technologies into standard practice.  This level of funding will allow NINR to cover current commitments and fund additional awards in this emerging area of research as part of a strategically balanced program portfolio.

End-of-Life

End-of-life science seeks to understand dying with respect to the needs of dying persons and formal and informal caregivers.  It includes research on issues such as:  alleviation of symptoms; psychological care; near-death preferences; advance directives; and family decision-making.  Likewise, end-of-life research addresses the cultural, spiritual, age- and disease-specific factors that make each person's experience at the end of life unique.  The NINR End-of-Life research program applies biological, behavioral, and social science strategies to advance the understanding of the dynamic interactions of these various factors, and to develop interventions that optimize patient and caregiver quality of life across care settings and cultural contexts.

NINR currently supports Centers in Self-Management or End-of-Life Research. These Centers serve as a nexus for the emergence of end-of-life research as an interdisciplinary science, training investigators from multiple backgrounds and enhancing collaboration to increase the quality and quantity of innovative, interventional research projects in end-of-life and palliative care science.

Portrait of a Program: End-of-Life Research
FY 2009 Level:     $11.833 million

FY 2010 Level:     $11.984 million

Change:     $ 0.151 million

The life expectancy of the American people has reached a historic high, but along with increased life expectancy comes an increase in the number of people living with, and dying from, chronic debilitating diseases.  Prolonged courses of decline at the end of life, palliative treatment options, and life-sustaining technologies have raised many important research questions within the last decade.  In addition, the needs of dying children and their families are coming into greater focus.1  Although fewer pediatric patients die, death in childhood stands out as a particular tragedy and a unique end-of-life experience for all involved.  In 1997, the Director of NIH designated NINR as the lead NIH Institute for end-of-life research, providing an important opportunity for NINR-supported science to set strategic priorities in this crucial area of science.   Consistent with this role, NINR has sponsored numerous research initiatives related to end-of-life science, and currently supports Centers of Excellence in End-of-Life or Self-Management Research.  NINR recently co-sponsored an initiative to develop and test interventions to enhance end-of-life and palliative care that providers can implement across multiple settings, illnesses, and cultural contexts.  In FY 2010, NINR will support a new effort under its end-of-life program to conduct pediatric palliative care research.  This research will seek to improve quality of life for children who are facing a life-threatening illness, and to intervene in helping children cope while a parent or sibling faces a terminal illness.

1 Institute of Medicine (2002).  When children die: Improving palliative and end-of-life care for children and their families.  Washington, DC: The National AcademiesPress.

Budget Policy: The FY 2010 budget estimate for this program is $11.984 million, an increase of $151 thousand or 1.2 percent above the FY 2009 estimate.  Given the enormous potential and great need for improving the quality of life of dying patients and their caregivers, NINR plans to expand end-of-life research efforts in FY 2010 to build upon continuing accomplishments in this program area.  This level of funding will allow NINR to support existing commitments, including the Institute's Centers of Excellence in End-of-Life Research, and to fund additional awards in this critical area of research, as part of an overall balanced program portfolio.  Also in FY 2010, NINR will support a new effort in end-of-life research that will seek to advance palliative care research for children experiencing serious illness or bereavement.

Intramural Research Program

NINR's Intramural Research Program (IRP) supports research to understand the underlying biological mechanisms of a range of symptoms, their effect on patients, and how patients respond to interventions.  Recent scientific efforts have included evaluating the efficacy of novel interventions for managing symptoms associated with cancer treatment, and exploring the molecular and genetic mechanisms that influence an individual's response to analgesic treatment for acute pain.  The IRP also supports research training opportunities through programs such as the NINR Career Transition Award, the NINR Summer Genetics Institute, and by participating in the NIH Graduate Partnerships Program.

Portrait of a Program: Understanding the Biological Mechanisms of Pain
FY 2009 Level:     $3.943 million

FY 2010 Level:     $4.002 million

Change:     $ 0.059 million

Millions of Americans suffer from pain.  A national survey revealed that twenty-six percent of adults experienced pain that lasted throughout the day in the month prior, and of those adults, forty-two percent experienced the pain a year or more.2  Some people develop pain as a consequence of a serious illness, such as those who experience pain related to chemotherapy treatments for cancer, while for others, chronic pain itself is a disease.  Understanding the biologic and genetic mechanisms of pain is vital for developing effective treatments for managing pain and improving quality of life.  Researchers in the NINR laboratories in Bethesda, Maryland are using new genetic and proteomic tools to better determine an individual's response to pain and treatments for pain.  These researchers are integrating comparative studies of variations in genetics, protein biomarkers, and personal characteristics to understand individual variations in response to analgesic treatments for chronic pain conditions.  Identifying these variations will allow for targeted use of gene chips to better characterize molecular-genetic mechanisms of pain and analgesia, suggest new applications, and test the efficacy and adverse reactions of newly developed or currently used drugs.  Studies such as these that attempt to understand the interrelationship among an individual's personal and genetic makeup and their response to pain move us ever closer to realizing a future of personalized medicine.  In FY 2010, NINR will continue to support this vital program of research and build upon the promising advances that have emanated from these scientists in recent years.

2 National Center for Health Statistics, Health, United States, 2006, With Chart book on Trends in the Health of Americans, Hyattsville, MD: 2006; p 68-70.

In 2008, the IRP sponsored the ninth annual NINR Summer Genetics Institute (SGI).  The SGI provides students with a foundation in molecular genetics for use in research and clinical practice to develop and expand research capacity among graduate students and faculty in nursing.  This program is approved for graduate credit in nursing at the doctoral level.  Through this program, NINR prepares nurses to address important scientific questions, such as those arising from the Human Genome Project and other emerging genetic discoveries.

Budget Policy: The FY 2010 budget estimate for this program is $4.002 million, an increase of $59 thousand or 1.5 percent above the FY 2009 estimate.  In FY 2010, this program will continue to support innovative research to address the scientific challenges of understanding and managing adverse symptoms such as acute and chronic pain.  This program will also continue to support important training and career development opportunities for innovative investigators.

Research Management and Support

NINR Research Management and Support (RMS) activities provide administrative, budgetary, logistical, and scientific support in the review, award, and monitoring of research grants, training awards and research and development contracts.  The functions of RMS also encompass strategic planning, coordination, and evaluation of the Institute's programs and liaison with other Federal agencies, Congress, and the public.

Budget Policy: The FY 2010 budget estimate for RMS is $10.321 million, an increase of $178 thousand or 1.8 percent above the FY 2009 estimate.  In FY 2010, NINR plans to continue addressing the challenges and opportunities that exist in strategically managing a research portfolio that addresses areas of science critical to public health.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Institute of Nursing Research

Budget Authority by Object

 FY 2009 EstimateFY 2010 PBIncrease or DecreasePercent Change
Total compensable workyears:    
Full-time employment505112.0
Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours0000.0
Average ES salary$0$0$00.0
Average GM/GS grade12.212.20.00.0

Average GM/GS salary
$89,184$90,789$1,6051.8

Average salary, grade established by act of
July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207)
$106,666$109,972$3,3063.1
Average salary of ungraded positions69,25277,1477,89511.4
     
OBJECT CLASSESFY 2009 EstimateFY 2010 PBIncrease or DecreasePercent Change
Personal Compensation:    
11.1 Full-time permanent$3,623,000$3,737,000$114,0003.1

11.3 Other than full-time permanent
1,026,0001,090,00064,0006.2

11.5 Other personnel compensation
146,000151,0005,0003.4
11.7 Military personnel246,000274,00028,00011.4

11.8 Special personnel services payments
189,000211,00022,00011.6
Total, Personnel Compensation5,230,0005,463,000233,0004.5
12.0 Personnel benefits1,348,0001,410,00062,0004.6
12.2 Military personnel benefits117,000130,00013,00011.1
13.0 Benefits for former personnel0000.0
Subtotal, Pay Costs6,695,0007,003,000308,0004.6
21.0 Travel and transportation of persons171,000169,000(2,000)-1.2
22.0 Transportation of things3,0003,00000.0

23.1 Rental payments to GSA
0000.0

23.2 Rental payments to others
89,00083,000(6,000)-6.7

23.3 Communications, utilities and
miscellaneous charges
61,00061,00000.0

24.0 Printing and reproduction
21,00021,00000.0

25.1 Consulting services
49,00049,00000.0

25.2 Other services
1,147,0001,124,000(23,000)-2.0

25.3 Purchase of goods and services from
government accounts
8,594,0008,596,0002,0000.0
25.4 Operation and maintenance of facilities305,000289,000(16,000)-5.2

25.5 Research and development contracts
211,000266,00055,00026.1

25.6 Medical care
0000.0

25.7 Operation and maintenance of equipment
39,00038,000(1,000)-2.6
25.8 Subsistence and support of persons0000.0
25.0 Subtotal, Other Contractual Services10,345,00010,362,00017,0000.2
26.0 Supplies and materials267,000250,000(17,000)-6.4

31.0 Equipment
293,000288,000(5,000)-1.7

32.0 Land and structures
0000.0

33.0 Investments and loans
0000.0

41.0 Grants, subsidies and contributions
123,934,000125,509,0001,575,0001.3
42.0 Insurance claims and indemnities0000.0
43.0 Interest and dividends0000.0
44.0 Refunds0000.0
Subtotal, Non-Pay Costs135,184,000136,746,0001,562,0001.2
Total Budget Authority by Object141,879,000143,749,0001,870,0001.3
Includes FTEs which are reimbursed from the NIH Roadmap for Medical Researc

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Institute of Nursing Research

Salaries and Expenses

OBJECT CLASSESFY 2009
Estimate
FY 2010
PB
Increase or
Decrease
Percent
Change
Personal Compensation:    
Full-time permanent (11.1)$3,623,000$3,737,000$114,0003.1
Other than full-time permanent (11.3)1,026,0001,090,00064,0006.2
Other personnel compensation (11.5)146,000151,0005,0003.4
Military personnel (11.7)246,000274,00028,00011.4
Special personnel services payments (11.8)189,000211,00022,00011.6
Total Personnel Compensation (11.9)5,230,000 5,463,000233,000 4.5
Civilian personnel benefits (12.1)1,348,0001,410,00062,0004.6
Military personnel benefits (12.2)117,000130,00013,00011.1
Benefits to former personnel (13.0)0000.0
Subtotal, Pay Costs6,695,0007,003,000308,0004.6
Travel (21.0)171,000169,000(2,000)-1.2
Transportation of things (22.0)3,0003,00000.0
Rental payments to others (23.2)89,00083,000(6,000)-6.7
Communications, utilities and
miscellaneous charges (23.3)
61,00061,00000.0
Printing and reproduction (24.0)21,00021,00000.0
Other Contractual Services:    
Advisory and assistance services (25.1)49,00049,00000.0
Other services (25.2)1,147,0001,124,000(23,000)-2.0
Purchases from government accounts (25.3)4,983,0004,982,000(1,000)0.0
Operation and maintenance of facilities (25.4)305,000289,000(16,000)-5.2
Operation and maintenance of equipment (25.7)39,00038,000(1,000)-2.6
Subsistence and support of persons (25.8)0000.0
Subtotal Other Contractual Services6,523,0006,482,000(41,000)-0.6
Supplies and materials (26.0)267,000250,000(17,000)-6.4
Subtotal, Non-Pay Costs7,135,0007,069,000(66,000)-0.9
     
Total, Administrative Costs13,830,00014,072,000242,0001.7

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NATIONALINSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Institute of Nursing Research

Authorizing Legislation

 PHS Act /Other CitationU.S. Code Citation2009 Amount AuthorizedFY 2009 Estimate2010 Amount AuthorizedFY2010 PB
Research and InvestigationSection 30142§241Indefinite
$141,879,000
Indefinite
$143,749,000
National Institute of Nursing ResearchSection 402(a)42§281IndefiniteIndefinite
       
Total, Budget Authority   141,879,000 $143,749,000

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Institute of Nursing Research

Appropriations History

Fiscal YearBudget Estimate to CongressHouse AllowanceSenate AllowanceAppropriation 1/
200184,714,000 2/102,312,000106,848,000104,370,000
Rescission(20,000)
2002117,686,000 2/116,773,000125,659,000120,451,000
Rescission(23,000)
2003129,768,000131,438,000131,438,000131,438,000
Rescission(854,000)
2004134,579,000134,579,000135,579,000135,555,000
Rescission(831,000)
2005139,198,000139,198,000140,200,000138,198,000
Rescission(1,126,000)
2006138,729,000138,729,000142,549,000138,729,000
Rescission(1,387,000)
2007137,342,000136,550,000137,848,000137,404,000
2008137,800,000139,527,000140,456,000139,920,000
Rescission(2,244,000)
Supplemental731,000
2009137,609,000142,336,000141,439,000141,879,000
2010143,749,000   
1/ Reflects enacted supplementals, rescissions, and reappropriations.  
2/ Excludes funds for HIV/AIDS research activities consolidated in the NIH Office of AIDS Research.  

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Institute of Nursing Research

Details of Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTEs)

OFFICE/DIVISIONFY 2008 ActualFY 2009 EstimateFY 2010 PB
Office of the Director444
Office of the Administrative Management101313
Division of Intramural Research101010
Office Associate Director of Scientific Programs192324
    
Total435051
Includes FTEs which are reimbursed from the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research
FTEs supported by funds from Cooperative Research
and Development Agreements
(0)(0)(0)
FISCAL YEARAverage GM/GS Grade
200611.9
200712.2
200812.0
200912.2
201012.2

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Institute of Nursing Research

Detail of Positions

GRADEFY 2008 ActualFY 2009 EstimateFY 2010 PB
Total, ES Positions000
Total, ES Salary000
GM/GS-15455
GM/GS-1481010
GM/GS-13141516
GM/GS-12577
GM/GS-11344
GM/GS-10111
GM/GS-9555
GM/GS-8000
GM/GS-7111
GM/GS-6111
GM/GS-5000
GM/GS-4111
GM/GS-3000
GM/GS-2000
GM/GS-1000
Subtotal435051
Grades established by Act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207):   
Assistant Surgeon General000
Director Grade111
Senior Grade000
Full Grade000
Senior Assistant Grade222
Assistant Grade000
Subtotal333
Ungraded191919
Total permanent positions424242
Total positions, end of year626262
Total full-time equivalent (FTE)
employment, end of year
435051
Average ES salary000
Average GM/GS grade12.012.212.2
Average GM/GS salary86,84089,18490,789
Includes FTEs which are reimbursed from the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research.  

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Institute of Nursing Research

New Positions Requested

 
FY 2010
 GradeNumberAnnual
Salary
Senior Research Specialist131$106,000
    
    
Total Requested  
1

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