August 19, 2015

This summer, NINR held its 16th annual Summer Genetics Institute (SGI), an intensive one-month research training program held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus in Bethesda, Maryland. NINR sponsors the tuition-free SGI to provide nursing graduate students, faculty, and clinicians with a foundation in molecular genetics appropriate for use in research and clinical practice.

The latest SGI cohort of 25 people represented 21 different universities across the country. Participants learned from some of the world’s leading genetics and genomics experts. As part of the updated and revised SGI curriculum for 2015, trainees began their first week of the SGI in the laboratory in combination with classroom lectures. Hands-on lab training allowed participants to use the latest tools and techniques, such as  extracting DNA and RNA, analyzing PCR and sequencing results, separating proteins by western blot and cells by flow cytometry, and several other techniques. The cohort also participated in several networking events where former SGI alumni gave presentations on how they integrate genomics into their current research.

NINR congratulates the SGI Class of 2015! Visit www.ninr.nih.gov/sgi this fall to learn more about this outstanding research training opportunity and apply for your spot at SGI 2016.

Later in the summer, the NINR Big Data in Symptoms Research Boot Camp, part of the NINR Symptom Research Methodologies Series, hosted a one-week intensive research training course at the NIH campus. Sponsored by the NINR, the course is administered by the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences (FAES).

Due to the popularity of the “big data” topic from 2014 and with 145 participants in 2015, the first day of the Big Data Boot Camp was videocast live and is now available. To watch the videocast, visit: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=16469&bhcp=1.  

NINR's 2015 Boot Camp provided a foundation in data science focusing on methodologies and strategies for incorporating novel methods into research proposals. The course featured lectures by distinguished guest speakers, classroom discussion, and hands-on training with real-world Big Data. This year’s course covered introductory knowledge; how to use Big Data in clinical practice and in symptom research; ethical, legal, and regulatory aspects in data use; and data mining as a tool for research and knowledge development.

For more information on NINR’s Boot Camp, please visit: http://www.ninr.nih.gov/bootcamp. Boot Camp registration typically opens in the spring, so mark your calendar and check back soon regarding the 2016 course topics.