August 1, 2010

In this Issue:

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1. NIH Seeks to Break New Ground in Reducing Health Disparities

2. Keynote Speakers Announced for NINR’s 2010 Science Symposium

3. NINR Invites Applications for the 2011 Graduate Partnerships Program

4. Application Period Extended for the 2010 BNC Fellowship

5. Current Funding Opportunity Announcements and Notices

6. Upcoming Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research

7. NIH Intramural Research Program Recruiting Earl Stadtman Investigators

8. NINR Seeking Applications for Two Tenure-Track Investigator Positions

9. NIH OppNet: New Funding Opportunities, October Open Meeting

10. Two New Health Economics Funding Opportunity Announcements


1. NIH Seeks to Break New Ground in Reducing Health Disparities

Earlier this month, the NIH announced the launch of the Network on Inequality, Complexity, and Health (NICH), a multidisciplinary network of experts who will explore new approaches to understanding the origins of health disparities, or differences in the burden of disease among population groups.

NICH’s goal is to use state-of-the-science conceptual and computational models to identify important areas where interventions or policy changes could have the greatest impact in eliminating health disparities. The NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) is contracting with the University of Michigan's School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, to establish NICH.

Comprised of scientists with expertise across disciplines, including economics, biology, ecology, computer science, education, sociology, mathematics and epidemiology, NICH will be the first network to apply systems science approaches to the study of health inequities. Systems science methods enable investigators to examine the dynamic interrelationships of variables at multiple levels of analysis (e.g., from cells to society) simultaneously. They also study the impact on the behavior of the system as a whole over time.

NICH researchers will examine how factors such as access to health care, neighborhood environment, educational opportunities, physiology and genetics all may interact over the course of a person’s life to influence risk for diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

“NICH brings together scientists from many different disciplines to create a new conceptual approach for examining the behavioral, social and biological factors which interact to cause inequalities in health,” said Deborah H. Olster, PhD, acting director of OBSSR.

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2. Keynote Speakers Announced for NINR’s 2010 Science Symposium

NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins and Dr. Alan Leshner, Chief Executive Officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and Executive Publisher of the journal Science, have been announced as keynote speakers for Bringing Science to Life, the scientific symposium which will kick off the commemoration of NINR’s 25th Anniversary on September 30, 2010.

Dr. Francis Collins

Collins, a physician-geneticist noted for his landmark discoveries of disease genes and his leadership of the Human Genome Project, served as director of NIH's National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) from 1993-2008. Under his direction, the Human Genome Project consistently met projected milestones ahead of schedule and under budget. This remarkable international project culminated in April 2003 with the completion of a finished sequence of the human DNA instruction book.

Collins, the 16th Director of the NIH, was nominated by President Obama on July 8, 2009 and was unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate on August 7, 2009. As Director, he has been a highly visible advocate for public health research on and off the NIH campus, through media appearances on Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report” and in Parade magazine, and by holding town hall-style meetings with NIH colleagues and constituents. Collins was awarded the National Medal of Science on September 17, 2009.

In addition to his achievements as the NHGRI director, Dr. Collins’ own research laboratory has discovered a number of important genes, including those responsible for cystic fibrosis, neurofibromatosis, Huntington’s disease, a familial endocrine cancer syndrome, and most recently, genes for type 2 diabetes and the gene that causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

Dr. Alan Leshner

Leshner leads AAAS, the world's largest, multidisciplinary scientific and engineering society. Before coming to AAAS, Leshner was director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) from 1994-2001. NIDA supports over 85% of the world's research on the health aspects of drug abuse and addiction.

Before becoming director of NIDA, Leshner served as deputy director and acting director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). He went to NIMH from the National Science Foundation (NSF), where he held a variety of senior positions focusing on basic research in the biological, behavioral, and social sciences; science policy; and science education. The author of a major textbook on the relationship between hormones and behavior, Leshner has published more than 150 papers for both the scientific and lay communities on the biology of behavior, science and technology policy, science education, and public engagement with science.

Bringing Science to Life will be held from 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, September 30, in the Ruth L. Kirschstein Auditorium on the NIH Campus in Bethesda, Maryland. The program is free of charge.

Free, online registration is available on the NINR website at www.ninr.nih.gov/newsandinformation/25years.

For bios of the symposium’s scientific speakers, please visit http://www.ninr.nih.gov/newsandinformation/25years/scientificspeakers.

For the latest updates on all of NINR's 25th Anniversary news and events, subscribe to the 25th Anniversary RSS Feed at www.ninr.nih.gov/Rss, visit www.ninr.nih.gov/newsandinformation/25years, or send email to info@ninr.nih.gov.

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3. NINR Invites Applications for the 2011 Graduate Partnerships Program

The NINR Graduate Partnerships Program (GPP) is a doctoral fellowship training program that coordinates training and funding for doctoral students attending a school of nursing supported by an NINR-funded Institutional Research Training (T32) grant. The program combines the academic environment of a university and the breadth and depth of research at NIH.

Please note: To be eligible for the NINR GPP, the applicant must currently attend (or be accepted to) a school of nursing supported by a T32 grant funded by NINR.

Application instructions and answers to frequently asked questions are available online at https://www.training.nih.gov/programs/gpp/appinfo.

The application period for the NINR GPP will open on Sept. 1, 2010 and close on Jan. 3, 2011.

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Natalie A. Rasmussen
Intramural Research Training Director, Assistant Clinical Investigator
Email: rasmussenna@mail.nih.gov

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4. Application Period Extended for the 2010 BNC Fellowship

The application deadline for the BNC Fellowship for research in integrative medicine has been extended to September 15, 2010. Jointly sponsored by the Bravewell Collaborative, NINR, and the NIH Clinical Center (BNC), the BNC Fellowship provides a unique opportunity that combines the academic environment of a university with the breadth and depth of the intramural research program at the NIH.

The full-time, two-year program includes participation in clinical and research experiences with a clinical integrative health focus, and encourages interdisciplinary collaboration to optimize health and healing for individuals, families, and communities. To be eligible, an applicant must be a U.S. citizen and have successfully completed a PhD or equivalent research-based doctoral degree within the past five years.

Please note: The BNC application must be completed online. In addition, all applicants must submit by mail a hardcopy, 3-page biobehavioral research proposal on a topic relevant to integrative medicine.

The online application is due September 15, 2010. In addition, the mailed research proposal must be postmarked no later than September 10, 2010. Only complete applications will be reviewed.

More information is available at www.ninr.nih.gov/training/trainingopportunitiesintramural/bncfellowship. The BNC Fellowship begins on November 1, 2010.

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Natalie A. Rasmussen
Intramural Research Training Director, Assistant Clinical Investigator
Email: rasmussenna@mail.nih.gov

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5. Current Funding Opportunity Announcements and Notices

All current NINR Funding Opportunity Announcements, including Requests for Applications (RFAs) and Program Announcements (PAs), as well as notices of interest from NIH, are available on the NINR website at http://www.ninr.nih.gov/researchandfunding/dea/oep/fundingopportunities.

These items can also be found in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/index.html.

Recent opportunities of note include:

Health Promotion Among Racial and Ethnic Minority Males (R01, R21)  PA-10-236 (PA-10-237)
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-10-236.html

Integrating Biobehavioral and Sociocultural Research to Prevent HIV Transmission and Infection (R01, R21)
PA-08-188 (PA-08-189)

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-08-188.html

Research on Clinical Decision Making in People with or at Risk for Life-Threatening Illness (R21)
PA-09-121

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-121.html

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6. Upcoming Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research

The open session of the 72nd meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research (NACNR) will take place on September 14, 2010 in Wilson Hall, Building 1, 3rd Floor, on the NIH campus. Visitors are welcome to attend.

The NACNR meets three times a year to provide recommendations on the direction and support of the nursing, biomedical, social, and behavioral research that forms the evidence base for nursing practice. More information about the NACNR is available online at http://www.ninr.nih.gov/aboutninr/nacnr. Information on visiting the NIH campus is available online at http://www.nih.gov/about/visitor/index.htm.

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7. NIH Intramural Research Program Recruiting Earl Stadtman Investigators

NINR is pleased to be part of a new NIH Intramural Research Program employment opportunity for top-tier tenure-track candidates to become “NIH Earl Stadtman Investigators.” The NIH Intramural Research Program seeks creative and independent thinkers from across diverse disciplines and backgrounds who are eager to take on high-risk, high-impact research. Areas of active recruitment include sensory biology and the neurosciences, symptoms research, systems biology, stem cells, infectious diseases and bioinformatics.

Applicants should share their ideas for a novel research program and detail how their career aspirations contribute to the NIH mission. Candidates must have an MD, PhD, DDS/DMD, DVM, DO, RN/PhD, or equivalent doctoral degree and have an outstanding record of research accomplishments as evidenced by publications in major peer-reviewed journals. Preference will be given to applicants who are in the early stages of their research careers; only non-tenured applicants will be considered. Candidates in any area of biomedical, translational and behavioral research are invited to apply. Appointees may be U.S. citizens, resident aliens or non-resident aliens with, or eligible to obtain, a valid employment-authorization visa.

Complete applications must be received by October 1, 2010. Interested applicants must submit a curriculum vitae, a three-page research plan, a one-page description of their vision for their future research and its potential impact, and contact information for three professional references through the NIH’s tenure track online application system at http://tenuretrack.nih.gov/apply. Letters of recommendation will be requested automatically when you submit your application. No paper applications will be accepted.

Search committees will identify the most highly qualified candidates to invite to the NIH campus for a lecture open to the NIH scientific staff in December 2010 and for interviews with the search committees. Top candidates then will be nominated as finalists for Earl Stadtman tenure-track positions.

Earl and Thressa Stadtman

The inspiring story of Earl and Thressa Stadtman’s (pictured left) research is online at http://history.nih.gov/exhibits/stadtman.

More information about the NIH Intramural Research Program is online at https://intramural.nih.gov/search and http://sourcebook.od.nih.gov/sci-prgms/sci-prgms-toc.htm.

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Roland Owens
Assistant Director
NIH Office of Intramural Research
Email: owensrol@mail.nih.gov

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8. NINR Seeking Applications for Two Tenure-Track Investigator Positions

The NINR Intramural Research Program is seeking applications from outstanding nurse-scientists for two positions as Tenure-Track Investigators in its Symptoms Management Branch, Tissue Injury Branch and/or Biobehavioral Branch, located at the NIH campus in Bethesda, Md.

The investigator in the Symptoms Management Branch will work as a member of an inter-disciplinary team conducting research on the molecular-genetic events underlying symptoms, their manifestation as signs and symptoms of illness, and the evaluation of novel therapeutic interventions for symptoms management.

The investigator in the Tissue Injury Branch will conduct clinical and laboratory-based studies on the mechanisms of tissue injury, including the identification of molecular targets and pathways activated in response to cellular damage, to provide greater understanding of the pathophysiology associated with tissue injury and identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

The investigator in the Biobehavioral Branch will conduct clinical and laboratory interdisciplinary research that integrates biological and behavioral sciences. Studies could focus on a range of areas including identification of biological markers for disease, biological impact of behavior, the interaction of biological mechanisms with behavioral responses, and the testing of biobehavioral interventions to improve health.

The Investigators in these Branches will serve as Principal Investigators on clinical protocols to be conducted at the NIH Clinical Research Center and affiliated facilities. Applicants are expected to have a clinical nursing degree and have received a PhD with evidence of research experience that suggests the potential to initiate and conduct an independent program of research. The NINR positions offer unparalleled opportunities for multidisciplinary collaboration throughout NIH.

These positions include resources, space, and personnel to support a fully funded independent program of research. Salary is commensurate with experience. This appointment offers a full benefits package (including retirement, health, life and long term care insurance, Thrift Savings Plan, etc.).

Applicants should submit their curriculum vitae, bibliography, a letter describing their clinical and/or basic research, management experience and proposed research plan, along with three letters of recommendation to:

Dr. Sharon Wahl
Chair, Tenure-Track Search Committee
E-mail: smwahl@mail.nih.gov

For more information, visit
http://www.ninr.nih.gov/aboutninr/organizationinformation/ninrjobopportunities.

Applications must be received by close of business October 15, 2010

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9. NIH OppNet: New Funding Opportunities, October Open Meeting

NINR announces several new funding opportunities through OppNet, the NIH’s Basic Behavioral and Social Science Research Opportunity Network. Researchers interested in learning more about OppNet are welcome to attend its upcoming open meeting, “OppNet:  Expanding Opportunities in Basic Behavioral and Social Science Research,” to be held on Thursday and Friday, October 28-29, 2010, in Washington, DC.

About OppNet:

OppNet is a trans-NIH initiative that funds activities that build the collective body of knowledge about the nature of behavior and social systems, and that deepen our understanding of basic mechanisms of behavioral and social processes. All 24 NIH Institutes and Centers that fund research and four Program Offices within the NIH Office of the Director co-fund and co-manage OppNet.

OppNet makes each of its funding opportunities available through one of its 24 member Institutes and Centers (ICs). Consequently, the NIH IC that makes each FOA/RFA available to the public is not necessarily the NIH Institute or Center that ultimately will manage a funded OppNet project. For more information about OppNet, visit http://oppnet.nih.gov.

New OppNet Funding Opportunities of Note:

RFA-HD-11-101: Sleep and social environment: Basic biopsychosocial processes (R01)

This OppNet RFA solicits Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to investigate the reciprocal interactions of the processes of sleep and circadian regulation and function with behavioral and social environment processes.  Sleep is a complex biological phenomenon that is essential to normal behavioral and social functioning, as well as optimal health.  In spite of its vital nature, the mechanisms by which social environment factors affect sleep behavior patterns have not been studied systematically, especially within the context of individual vulnerabilities and resilience. There is a need for greater understanding of the dynamic relationships between behavioral and social environment factors on the one hand and the basic mechanisms of sleep-wake and circadian regulation and function on the other.  This FOA is not intended to support research on or development of treatments or interventions for disorders of sleep or circadian rhythms.

Letter of intent receipt date: September 8, 2010
Application due date: October 8, 2010
For more information:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HD-11-101.html

RFA-HD-11-102: Sleep and social environment: Basic biopsychosocial processes (R21)

This OppNet RFA solicits Research Project Grant (R21) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to investigate the reciprocal interactions of the processes of sleep and circadian regulation and function with behavioral and social environment processes.  Sleep is a complex biological phenomenon that is essential to normal behavioral and social functioning, as well as optimal health.  In spite of its vital nature, the mechanisms by which social environment factors affect sleep behavior patterns have not been studied systematically, especially within the context of individual vulnerabilities and resilience. There is a need for greater understanding of the dynamic relationships between behavioral and social environment factors on the one hand and the basic mechanisms of sleep-wake and circadian regulation and function on the other. This FOA is not intended to support research on or development of treatments or interventions for disorders of sleep or circadian rhythms.

Letter of intent receipt date: September 8, 2010
Application due date: October 8, 2010
For more information:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HD-11-102.html

RFA-DA-11-003: Effects of the social environment on health: Measurement, methods, and mechanisms (R01)

This OppNet RFA solicits Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to investigate structural, behavioral, sociocultural, environmental, cognitive, emotional, and/or biological mechanisms through which the social environment affects health outcomes.  To address this objective, applicants should propose research studies that will:  (1) deepen our understanding of which aspects of social environments affect health outcomes for women and men at different stages of the lifecourse and in different social, economic, geographic, racial and ethnic sub-populations; (2) lead to a clearer understanding of mechanisms through which social environments have such effects; or (3) improve measurement methods and/or contribute to advances in analytic methods used in the study of social environments and health.

Letter of intent receipt date: December 6, 2010
Application due date:  January 6, 2011
For more information:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-11-003.html

RFA-AG-11-010: Basic Research on Self-Regulation (R21)

This OppNet FOA solicits exploratory/developmental (R21) research applications examining basic mechanisms of self-regulation. The intent of this FOA is to advance research on basic processes and mechanisms of self-regulation, capitalizing on recent advances in methods and theory from the psychological (social, personality, developmental), economic, neuroscience, sociocultural, and other behavioral and social science literatures. The current lack of consistency and conceptual integration in how self-regulation is studied across a range of disciplines hinders our understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying many important health and developmental outcomes.  Applications submitted to this FOA are expected to address one or more of the following basic behavioral and social science research (b-BSSR) challenges: (1) to precisely identify and operationally reconcile the basic processes and mechanisms involved in self-regulation of cognition, emotion, and behavior, and refine their measurement and theoretical conceptualizations, (2) to assess relations among various self-regulatory functions and their sub-components, and (3) to systematically characterize changes in self-regulatory functions over time, across different social and environmental contexts, and across the lifespan in both men and women. Applications are expected to engage investigators working at multiple levels of analysis and across disparate literatures.

Letter of intent receipt date: December 6, 2010
Application due date:  January 6, 2011
For more information:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-11-010.html

RFA-HL-11-033: Psychosocial Stress and Behavior: Integration of Behavioral and Physiological Processes (R01)

This OppNet FOA solicits R01 applications from institutions and organizations that propose to investigate the mechanistic pathways linking psychosocial stressors and behavior. This research will facilitate investigation of multiple and potentially bidirectional pathways underlying the link between psychosocial stressors and behaviors that may ultimately impact biological function, health, and disease. Applicants are encouraged to use model systems and longitudinal approaches to design innovative and integrative studies to elucidate how psychological factors, social factors, and environments impact the processes by which stressors are coupled with and influenced by various behaviors. Applications examining moderating factors such as individual demographic (age, gender/sex, ethnicity) and psychological (vulnerabilities, resilience) differences, risk factors, early exposure, and environments (including toxicants) are desirable. This research will provide a deeper understanding of the psychological, environmental, and social processes that ultimately connect psychosocial stress to behaviors, physiological processes, health, and disease.

Letter of intent receipt date: September 14, 2010
Application due date:  October 14, 2010
For more information:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-11-033.html

RFA-HL-11-034 Development of Comprehensive and Conceptually-based Measures of Psychosocial Stress (R21)

This OppNet FOA solicits Research Project Grant (R21) applications from institutions and organizations that propose to develop and validate conceptually-focused and comprehensive measures of psychosocial stress that can be applied across species and across the lifespan. Applicants submitting applications under this FOA are encouraged to incorporate variations in exposures, chronicity, environments (including toxicants and social environments), cognitions, and responses, as well as capture important factors for measuring stress in both humans and animals, in men and women, and across the lifespan.  Such studies should demonstrate that the measures, coupled with appropriate bridges between laboratory and population-based designs, advance our understanding of the components of psychosocial stressors that are most relevant to disease, and provide comparability across studies.

Letter of Intent Receipt Date(s): September 14, 2010
Application Due Date(s):  October 14, 2010
For more information:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-11-034.html

RFA-HL-11-035 Basic Mechanisms Influencing Behavioral Maintenance (R01)

This OppNet FOA solicits research applications examining basic mechanisms of behavioral maintenance. The intent of this FOA is to advance research on basic processes and mechanisms involved in sustaining learned behavior over time and in the context of dynamic environmental influences and changing psychological and biological states. Maintenance of health behavior change is a critical problem in applied clinical research, and innovative strategies to address this problem require a better understanding of basic processes and mechanisms involved in long-term behavior maintenance. This FOA requests applications that will improve our understanding of how newly learned, effortful, and goal-directed behaviors transition to less effortful, automatic, and essentially non-goal-directed behaviors that are more easily maintained over time.

A range of possible processes and mechanisms (e.g., neurobiological, cognitive, and environmental) may be proposed for study, and applicants are encouraged to study multiple mechanisms and their potential interactions. Regardless of mechanisms or processes of interest, however, applications should test how these mechanisms and processes facilitate or impede the transition from newly learned, effortful, and goal-directed behaviors to less effortful, automatic, and essentially non-goal-directed behaviors (i.e., transition to habitually maintained behaviors). A wide array of research applications are potentially appropriate under this FOA, ranging from animal neurobehavioral models to human learning studies of social and environmental influences that facilitate or impede the transition to habitually maintained behaviors.

Although the basic behavioral research proposed in response to this FOA eventually may have implications for the development of new and innovative strategies to promote maintenance of healthy behaviors in applied or clinical settings, the proposed research should not itself be applied or clinical in nature.  Instead, it should lay the basic behavioral and social science groundwork that in the future could be translated to applied or clinical interventions to facilitate the maintenance of healthy behaviors.  Proposed research can utilize human participants involved in a behavior change process, but the focus of any such research should be on the basic mechanisms that influence the transition to habitually maintained behaviors. Therefore, although the ultimate metric for success of this FOA is that the funded research results in promising new directions for the development of novel approaches to sustain healthy behavior change, the research proposed in response to this FOA must examine the basic processes and mechanisms responsible for the transition to habitually maintained behaviors.

Letter of intent receipt date: September 14, 2010
Application due date:  October 14, 2010
For more information:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HL-11-035.html

OppNet Meeting

OppNet invites all its stakeholders to participate in a free, open meeting:

“OppNet: Expanding Opportunities in Basic Behavioral and Social Science Research”

Thursday-Friday, October 28-29, 2010
Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC  20001
(202) 737-1234
http://washingtonregency.hyatt.com/hyatt/hotels/rooms/room-description.jsp

Registration is free. Capacity is limited to 500 people. The Hyatt Regency has a limited block of rooms at government rate. The plenary sessions will be webcast live and archived on OppNet’s website; however, this option is not available for breakout sessions.

For more information including the preliminary meeting agenda, visit OppNet’s website, http://oppnet.nih.gov/index.asp. To register, visit www.regonline.com/OppNet.

Meeting participants will spend the majority of their time in interactive breakout sessions to discuss future directions in the basic social and behavioral sciences (b-BSSR) relevant to health.  One set of sessions will focus on the following five themes that emerged from data submitted in response to OppNet’s January-February 2010 Request for Information (RFI):

  • Cognition and emotion
  • Culture
  • Decision-making
  • Development over the lifecourse
  • Gene/environment interactions

A second set of interactive sessions will explore over-arching issues in the basic behavioral and social sciences:

  • Use of b-BSSR advances in future applied research
  • Model animals
  • Neuroscience approaches in b-BSSR
  • 21st Century trans-disciplinary approaches in b-BSSR

For more information, visit http://oppnet.nih.gov or email infooppnet@nih.gov.

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10. Two New Health Economics Funding Opportunity Announcements

Two new NIH Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) invite applications to address health economics issues. Many of these FOAs are part of the NIH Health Economics Common Fund Program https://commonfund.nih.gov/healtheconomics/.

RFA-RM-10-015: Economics of Prevention (R21)

This FOA solicits R21 applications for research to conduct economic analyses of prevention and health. Applications must be responsive to one of four topic areas that target research that addresses costs of health care, benefits to the health care system and other sectors of the economy and cost-effectiveness all within the context of prevention and health.

Letter of intent receipt date: September 28, 2010
Application Receipt Date(s): October 26, 2010
For more information
: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-10-015.html

RFA-RM-10-016: Science of Structure, Organization and Practice Design in the Efficient Delivery of Effective Healthcare (R21)

This FOA solicits R21 applications for exploratory and developmental research projects that will lead to increased efficiency in the production of health and delivery of health care. Specifically, research sought under this announcement should inform 1) the identification of specific, modifiable causes of high and increasing health care costs related to the structure, organization, and production of health care; and 2) the development and refinement of interventions, practices, or policies that can address these causes while maintaining or enhancing outcomes.

Letter of intent receipt date: September 26, 2010
Application due date:  October 26, 2010
For more information:
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-10-016.html

For more information, please contact:

Lois A. Tully, PhD
Program Director
NINR Division of Extramural Activities
Email: tullyla@mail.nih.gov

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News and Notes is the newsletter of the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), part of the National Institutes of Health.


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